#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More

#0021 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part V)

As I promised towards the end of the last posting we are going to talk a bit about whether or not our L-Directed and R-Directed brains are genetically pre-programmed into us at birth. If they are NOT then they must be the result of learned behavior. A third possibility is that they may be a hybrid of genetics and learned behavior. My sense—based on observations of my own behavior—is that we are genetically setup to lean one way or the other, but conditioning plays a huge role in which way our brains are destined to develop. The late Gordon MacKenzie, a longtime creative force at Hallmark Cards, once told a…
Read More

#0020 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part IV)

…for all the brain’s complexity, its broad topography is simple and symmetrical. And until surprisingly recently, the scientific establishment considered the two regions separate but unequal. The left side, the theory went, was the crucial half, the half that made us human. The right side was subsidiary—the remnant, some argued, of an earlier stage of development. The left hemisphere was rational, analytic, and logical—everything we expect in a brain. The right hemisphere was mute, nonlinear, and instinctive—a vestige that nature had designed for a purpose that humans had outgrown. A Whole New Brain (Part One Chapter One: Right Brain Rising): Copyright © 2005, 2006 by Daniel H. Pink In today’s…
Read More

#0019 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part III)

What we now have with this insight into the human brain is an opportunity to go back and commence a process of a do-over on history. With these new findings at hand, any event in history is fair game for re-perusal. We could go back through the history books for another look; but this time we will have the advantage of a motive to add to our investigative portfolio. The motive I am talking about is the why factor of any given past event—especially big events (those with far-reaching influences)—and display it up on the big evidence board to see if new patterns will emerge! It would be highly impractical to do anything like that, but what…
Read More

#0018 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part II)

But this isn’t about the accept/reject-ability of homosexual behavior in my own eyes or even in God’s eyes; the theme of this series is much broader in scope than that. This blog is about the traditional Christian’s seeming inability to make sound moral decisions for themselves and the forces and factors that hinder them from doing so. If you’ve read my book: The Jesus Clone or my blog, you no doubt have gathered that I can be rather heavy-handed with my criticisms of conservative, tradition-centered Christians; but I have tried to remain objective—careful not to criticize actual persons—as I point out flaws in the general convoluted tenets and practices of…
Read More

#0017 Conservatives and progressives think differently (part I)

Many of my blogs deal with the differences between religious people and people who are not religious. I have done this and will continue to do it because I’m trying to establish pathways of commonalities on which people of religion and people who aren’t religious might meet up and travel together, even if it’s only for a short distance. The backstories of people in each of these groups are a better place to begin if we hope to accomplish any sort of a dialogue between them. First off, people in the group who think of themselves as religious have origins which predate their religious story. This origin along with all…
Read More

#0016 Trickledown theology (conclusion)

When you start to take inventory of the issues that the right-wingers support, you can get a better understanding that the problem isn’t in the individual items on the list it’s in their thoughts and feelings about them. What is the backstory behind the why of their beliefs and the reasons for them being so passionate about these issues—even to the point of anger over some of them? If we can start getting at this backstory then we might be able to bring some light into the room. A really good illustration of what I’m referring to is exampled in the most recent development around the Confederate flag. On June…
Read More

#0015 Trickledown theology (cont.)

A major difference between this reversionist movement and the original feudal movement is the feudal movement carried within its genes a predisposition for evolution; the reversionist movement doesn’t. This new movement seems to carry the opposite genes which seem to have set it on a course of devolution. The Middle Ages is pretty much the story of the Europe’s struggle to find its way again after the fall of the Roman Empire. The Romans had held much of Europe captive for the better part of 500 years. During that time the people, though living a life of enslavement had also been positively influenced by the Roman culture. Their way of…
Read More

#0014 Trickledown theology

In the 1980s under the Reagan administration the term trickledown economics popped up on the political and socioeconomic landscape of America. This was a strategy that was destined to catch on following the recession we had been through during most of the previous Carter administration. In short it was a tactic that would supposedly turn around the failing economy. The postulation was that an environment of prosperity could be induced by aiding the wealthiest Americans to prosper even more. In doing this, the advocates of trickledown economics claimed, the fruits of their prosperity would overflow and naturally trickledown to those of the rest of us every day Americans who were…
Read More

#0013 Proxyism

I will be happy if I get anything posted today. I am in the middle of moving out of our apartment and it’s just after six on Sunday night; I just got my computer setup and ready to use. In last Wednesday’s post I closed by saying I had more I wanted to say about the idea of mansions Jesus talks about in John 14: 2. This is still true, so here goes. In the typical feudal system the hierarchical structure is perfectly represented; the lord and his family sit on the top tier of the community and below him are all the other surfs or little people. These people…
Read More
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